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20121104
20121104
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
]. >> neil: all this stuff about sandy recovery thing going well. fox news alert, folks, it's not. welcome, i'm neil cavuto and a sandy response apparently crashing down. two million residents are still in the dark and cold. power outages no fewer than seven dates, gas lines stretching across miles. it's all spending frustration flaring. two days until election day, raising new questions it could boomerang on no less than president obama. more on that in a moment. first to the people still suffering like maria of staten island who is still left to pick up the pieces. how are things going? >> i wish they were saying going better but they are not. >> neil: blah is the problem right now? >> i know that the volunteers have been out there and i've heard that the marathon runners, to their credit have been and helping people as much as they can. the red cross is somewhere on staten island and national guard is here. there are massive amounts of volunteers giving out water and food. there are certain communities, large communities in staten island that have been virtually forgotten. >> neil: the pro
told hurricane sandy is proof we need apowerful federal government, the fema to provide emergency management. the just makes sense. disaster across state lines who but the fed can help? the new york times declared a big star requires big government. very few politicians are skeptical. it is a relief to turn to ron paul. doctor, it is of myths that we need fema? >> i think so. it causes more harm than good. we handle plus a disasters 204 years before we had fema i have taken this position for a long time since the was first in office and i kept getting reelected because people were tired of fema. locked into insurance and it is a bureaucracy. they just takeover. john: across thefed line they have to have rolled? >> no. we should have real insurance. it causes many of the problems because they say you have to have insurance. they will noo sell it. that tells you it is too dangerous. soap rich people are subsidized by the poor people they have a good time the houses are washed away. john: before the storm the president held a press conference that the red cross. >> we are here becaus
-- geraldo rivera recording. the northeast, storm of the century, hurricane sandy, and the savage weather systems that conspired with sandy to create the monster frankenstorm that killed well over 100 americans, 40 of them in new york city. and while an army of federal, state, and local workers, and many volunteers, have joined the massive relief and recovery effort, 2-1/2 million remain without power, four days after losing it monday evening. tens of thousands are displaced. their homes broken or destroyed. 5500 remain in new york city shelters. gaslines stretch for hours and tempers flair. and as life returns to normal for many millions, from north carolina to maine, with folks living in the most severely area, on the new jersey shore, or the new york city burrows of brooklyn, queens and stat ten island, it's doubtful the scars will ever fully heal. the shocking loss of life in and around the nation's largest and commercially most important city. the epic extent and depth of the damage. and the struggle to find essentials like food, water, power, shelter, continue to preoccupy and stres
to address the devination of hurricane sandy. >> we'll not tolerate red tape or bureaucracy. we go through tough times and we bounce back. the reason we bounce back is because we look out for one another and don't leave anybody behind. >> that's the way it is supposed to be. you might have hard time convincing folks in staten island and folks on it is new jersey shore no one is left behind. some of them haven't seen food, water or electricity or gasoline or fuel for the home in freezing conditions since the initial hit of hurricane sandy. they are not the only ones that feel left behind. some of those folks in the consulate in benghazi on the night of the september 11th felt left behind for nine hours as a heavy assault happened. carefully orchesterated and planned . felt left behind 15 days afterwards when the only explanation that the administration had that someone offended because they watched something on youtube. we should never leave an american behind whether they are on our shores struggling from the aftermath of a hurricane or trying to get out from under the guns was terrorist d
on the ad truthfulness or lack thereof. let me move you to hurricane sandy and something that karl rove, who as you know, was the architect of the bush campaign from the deputy white house chief of staff for george w. bush, and he said the washington post, "if you hadn't had the storm, there would have been more of a chance for the romney campaign to talk about the deficit, the debt, the economy. there was a stutter in the campaign. when you have attention drawn away to somewhere else, to something else, it is not to his -- meaning governor romney's -- advantage." do you think that hurricane sandy or superstorm sandy and the president's handling of it stopped mitt romney's momentum and helped the president? >> you know, i don't know. i can't judge that. i have been here in ohio watching on tv some of the scenes, including on your network yesterday of people who are really frustrated, which is, you know, typical of the natural disaster like this. our hearts go out to those folks, but it's tough for government to be able to respond. i don't know how it plays honestly. i know that right now if
into darkness have the race? we've got the latest on hurricane sandy damage,en and this we'll turn to the best of the best political remembers, analysts and race watchers to give us their take on the presidential race. we'll start with peggy noonan of the "wall street journal." dee dee myers of "vanity fair." richard lowry of the "national review." harvard university's david gergen. and our own john dickerson. then we'll talk to stu rothenberg of the stu rothenbe rothenberg political reports. allen stanford of the university of virginia center for politics, democratic pollster anna greenberg, and republican analyst leslie sanchez of the impacto group. and our own cbs news elections director anthony salvanto. we're coming to the end of the campaign 2012, and we've got it all on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning, again. most of the country is looking forward to election day, or at the least, looking forward to the campaign being over. but in large parts of the northeast, it is still the aft
, to the island today. here's what she said. >> we knew that staten island took a hard hit from hurricane sandy. so we want to make sure that the right resources are brought here as quickly as possible to help this community, which is so strong, recover more quickly. >> i can tell you that it's bitter cold. they have no electricity. one of the complaints is that all emphasis is on manhattan. i have a friend who's camped out in lower manhattan. they have no electricity in lower manhattan. con ed is making that emphasis to make electricity be restored. all you see is the trucks can get stuff out now that they have showed up. you don't see the utility company putting the electricity on. it is being restored in other parts. but the area hardest hit is still waiting. neil: what is remarkable is that a lot of local officials, the republican governor, a democratic president, each congratulating the other. each congratulating local officials that they are on top of it. that things are getting better. but to look at the scenes and the people with whom you have talked to today, they might want to hold th
for the latest on the superstorm, sandy. the storm is blamed for at least 111 deaths in the u.s. meantime shall as survivors try to recover, thousands of people still without power dealing with the cold now. forecasters say temperatures are expected to drop below freezing tonight and tomorrow evening. and sandwiches of comfort, we'll meet a lady making thousands to help out the victims. now back to fareed zakaria i can't gps. >>> sometimes the best way to think about big events, elections, crises, wars, is to step back and learn what we can from the past. that's why i brought together three of my favorite historians do just that and to help us figure out how the past can inform the present in this election. my guests are edmund morris. he has a new book out called "this living hand." sean wilentz also has a book out about ronald reagan and his times and many others including bob dylan and his times, a professor at princeton university and walter isaacson, the author of biographies of everything from henry kissinger to steve jobs. to benjamin franklin. after katrina, you were a native of new orl
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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